#1939book challenge

The Book of Tasty and Healthy Food (1939) is a cookbook written by scientists from the Institute of Nutrition of the Academy of Medical Scientists of the USSR.

The Book of Tasty and Healthy Food (1939) is a cookbook written by scientists from the Institute of Nutrition of the Academy of Medical Scientists of the USSR.

For anybody wishing to take part in another challenge this month, the year (chosen by Moira from Clothes in Books) is 1939. To quote Winston Churchill from that year:

We must not underrate the gravity of the task which lies before us or the temerity of the ordeal, to which we shall not be found unequal. We must expect many disappointments, and many unpleasant surprises, but we may be sure that the task which we have freely accepted is one not beyond the compass and the strength of the crime blogging community.

All you have to do is review a crime novel/story/film first published in 1939, and make sure you tell me about it somehow. Then at the end of the month, I’ll fashion a post bringing them all together.

 

 

About pastoffences

Past Offences exists to review classic crime and mystery books, with ‘classic’ meaning books originally published before 1987.
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26 Responses to #1939book challenge

  1. Oh Rich, you’ve obviously bagged the best one already, with the Russian cookbook.
    I’m glad 1939 met with your approval….

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  2. eatierney says:

    Do I have to have my own blog to write a review? 1939 is a favorite year of mine!!

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  3. Where do you want my ideas about 1939? Send it here in a comment or somewhere else? Marni

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  4. mikeripley says:

    1939… Geoffrey Household’s ‘Rogue Male’, Agatha Christie’s ‘Ten Little Niggers’ and Eric Ambler’s ‘Mask of Dimitrios’. Three real classics. Anything else of note happen that year???

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    • realthog says:

      Anything else of note happen that year???

      Well, there was The Spy in Black, the first Powell ‘n’ Pressburger movie. I was writing about it yesterday, and will be posting my piece soonish. Rich: How do I inform you when I’ve done this? Leave a comment here?

      Like

    • Keishon says:

      Hey thanks. I think I’ll tackle the Ambler. I actually started it awhile back. Now I have an incentive to finish it.

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  5. Pingback: Spy in Black, The (1939) | Noirish

  6. realthog says:

    Hi, Rich. My notes on The Spy in Black have accordingly been posted: http://noirencyclopedia.wordpress.com/2014/07/05/spy-in-black-the-1939/.

    If I get time during the month to post another 1939 offering or two, I’ll let you know again!

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  9. Pingback: Eric Ambler: The Mask of Dimitrios | Past Offences Classic Crime Fiction

  10. Pingback: Review: The Mask of Dimitrios (aka A Coffin for Dimitrios) by Eric Ambler | The Game's Afoot

  11. realthog says:

    Here’s a minor worry. I thought I’d re-read Ambler’s Cause for Alarm, which according to the copyright page of the Ambler omnibus Intrigue was, like Dimitrios, published in 1939. But I’ve just checked with Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Ambler#Novels) and it seems both the 1939 dates were for first US publication: Cause for Alarm is actually a 1938 book, and Dimitrios a 1937 book.

    Oops.

    I’m hugely enjoying Cause for Alarm nevertheless, but . . .

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  12. Pingback: Review: No Orchids for Miss Blandish by James Hadley Chase | The Game's Afoot

  13. realthog says:

    Taking you at your word that Ambler’s Cause for Alarm as eligible as The Mask of Dimitrios, I’ve posted a very hurried note at Goodreads..

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