#1930book sign-up page

Brighton_policeEvery month on Past Offences I gather together blog posts about crime fiction written or filmed in a particular year. I’ve called it Crimes of the Century. On his second go, JJ from the Invisible Event has picked 1930 for September.

There is something about this picture that makes me want to propose a caption competition as well…

If you want to take part, you can! When you’ve written your post, just let me know below. I’ll gather them all together at the end of the month.

Anyone can play, so over to you…

Small print

  • Don’t be shy!
  • Just comment below to link to your blog post.
  • If you want to play but you haven’t got a blog, I’m happy to have you as a guest poster, or to link to Goodreads or Amazon.
  • Books, comics, films, plays and TV also welcome.
  • Sorry in advance if I miss you in the round-up, although I am getting better at that bit.

About pastoffences

Past Offences exists to review classic crime and mystery books, with ‘classic’ meaning books originally published before 1987.
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57 Responses to #1930book sign-up page

  1. Well, I’ll buck my current trend and go for Peril At Cranbury Hall by John Rhode. Have you heard of him?

    Liked by 1 person

    • John says:

      I liked that one. Lucky you to have found a copy! I’ll be interested in your take. I called this “a great book for anyone interested in a training manual on how to solve a fair-play mystery novel” when I reviewed it back in Dec 2011. There’s a complex cipher in the book that requires a mathematical mind to understand. You may like that part!

      Like

      • Looking forward to it. I picked it up on Ebay for a tenner a couple of months ago. Not a first edition, but not far off – a “cheap edition” I think. Looking at Abebooks, where the cheapest available is £65, it looks like “Lucky” is understating it.

        Like

  2. Brad says:

    Whoo whoo! An actual “Golden Age” year! And what a year! (Thanks, JJ and Rich!)
    Murder at the Vicarage (Miss Marple’s debut)
    The French Powder Mystery (Ellery Queen’s second book and an improvement on The Roman Hat Mystery)
    It Walks by Night (Carr’s debut!!!)
    The Scarab Murder Case (S.S. Van Dine)
    The Longer Bodies (Gladys Mitchell)
    Strong Poison AND The Documents in the Case (Sayers)
    The Second Shot (Anthony Berkeley)
    The Secret of High Eldersham (John Rhode, writing as Miles Burton)
    Mystery Mile (Margery Allingham)
    Sir John Magill’s Last Journey (Freeman Wills Crofts)
    Charlie Chan Carries On (Earl Derr Biggers)
    The Maltese Falcon (Dashiell Hammett) – THE MALTESE FALCON, FOLKS!!!!
    Mr. Pottermack’s Oversight (R. Austin Freeman)
    Beggar’s Choice and The Coldstone (Patricia Wentworth)
    Dead Man’s Quarry (Ianthe Jerrold)
    The Crystal Beads Murder (Annie Haynes)
    The Person Called Z and The Mystery on the Moor (Jefferson Farjeon)

    I’m sure people will add to this list! I’m thinking JJ and I should do a double post comparing Miss Marple to Bencolin! Whaddaya say??

    Liked by 1 person

    • Very extensive list. Hard to add many more really. Surprised you didn’t include The Mysterious Mr Quinn though. Other options include:
      Murder by Latitude by Rufus King
      The Dying Alderman by Henry Wade
      Behind the Screen by The Detection Club
      Half Mast Murder and Death in a Deck-Chair by Milward Kennedy
      The League of Discontent and The four Armourers by Francis Beeding

      As to what I will review I’m not sure yet. Nothing in my TBR pile. May re-read a Christie or a Sayers.

      Like

      • In addition,you can add Pinehurst by John Rhode and The Hardway Diamonds Mystery by Miles Burton aka… well, you know.

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      • JJ says:

        Was kinda expecting a flood of Wade reviews in light of The Murder Room publishing him in his entirety, but so far nothing. Might try and fit Dying Alderman in as it’s apparently a good one….

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      • Brad says:

        It’s actually the only Wade I’ve read, and it is pretty good.

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      • Jason Half says:

        Thank you, Brad and Kate, for these lists! I’m reading Mignon Eberhart’s While the Patient Slept, but I’ve just ordered Half-Mast Murder by Milward Kennedy, and plan to make that my second pick for 1930. Plus, I haven’t read either author before, so I get to discover new stories and the writers that go with them.

        Like

    • JJ says:

      If I have time to look at It Walks by Night then a Marple/Bencolin post might be on, sure. Could be interesting!

      Like

    • pastoffences says:

      Ooh, I’ve got Crystal Beads on my Kindle.

      Like

  3. That picture most definitely warrants (ahem) a caption competition!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Bev Hankins says:

    I’m in! I’ve got The French Powder Mystery, Murder by Latitude, and The Hardway Diamonds Mystery all sitting on the TBR pile. Off to see what other 1930 treasures I might be able to explore…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bev Hankins says:

      Other possibilities on the TBR stack:
      The Wheelchair Corpse by Will Levinrew
      The Hammersmith Murders by David Frome
      The Mystery of Burnleigh Manor by Walter Livington
      Lock 14 by Georges Simenon
      About the Murder of Geraldine Foster by Anthony Abbott
      The Ticker Tape Murder by Milton Propper
      The Rynox Murder Mystery by Philip MacDonald
      Giant’s Bread by Mary Westmacott (Agatha Christie)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Is there such a thing as TBR pile envy?

        Liked by 1 person

      • John says:

        You absolutely have to read THE WHEELCHAIR CORPSE, Bev! Please include it for this challenge. It’s one of my favorite “alternative crime” books. Utterly loopy and the body count is ridiculously high. Everyone must read a Professor Brierley mystery before they die, I say. HA!

        Like

      • Bev Hankins says:

        Kate: I have way too many books on my TBR stack (not that I’m willing to part with any). I just can’t resist book sales and used book stores whenever they come my way.

        John: I absolutely plan on fitting The Wheelchair Corpse into the Sept TBR pile.

        Like

  5. JJ says:

    I can proffer Ellery Queen’s French Powder Mystery, Berkeley’s The Second Shot, and possibly more as I sort through my TBR. Was all ready to go on 1932, see, so this sudden change has caught me somewhat on the hop! More news as I get it…

    Like

  6. John says:

    Well you all know that I probably have 57 or more books from 1930. :^) Since there are several lists here of both familiar and the obscure (thanks Bev for including ol’ forgotten Milton Propper from Philadelphia) I’ll not add more names and titles. I’ll try to dig up an obscure American writer or two, but my guess is that my 1930 books are mostly well known Brits.

    Like

  7. Jason Half says:

    This provides another reason to try an author new to me: the only book on my shelf from Mignon G. Eberhart just happens to be 1930’s While the Patient Slept. I will give that one an examination…

    Like

  8. Jose Ignacio says:

    I’m looking forward to The Maltese Falcon. Have seen the film several times but, believe or not, I’ve haven’t read it so far and it’s on my TBR pile. Now I hve no excuse. Am also interested in reading Dead Man’s Quarry and have also on my TBR several Edgar Wallace’s books published in 1930.

    Like

  9. tracybham says:

    I will be reading The Diamond Feather by Helen Reilly. I may also read Strong Poison by Sayers (for the third time) but probably cannot get both reviewed in time.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. This sounds fun. I may have a copy of The Maltese Falcon around here somewhere…. Wikipedia says it first appeared in 1929 serialized in The Black Mask. But since the book would have come out later I think it should still count.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Pingback: AGATHA CHRISTIE AND THE DEADLY DUO | ahsweetmysteryblog

  12. Pingback: THE SPINSTER’S DEBUT: The Murder At the Vicarage | ahsweetmysteryblog

  13. Brad says:

    Happy September, everyone! And happy 1930!! Here’s my take on Christie’s classic, The Murder at the Vicarage. https://ahsweetmysteryblog.wordpress.com/2016/09/01/the-spinsters-debut-the-murder-at-the-vicarage/

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Pingback: ‘Tasteless and immoral’: the #1954book results | Past Offences: Classic crime, thrillers and mystery book reviews

  15. Bev Hankins says:

    My first 1930 boo: The Wheelchair Corpse by Will Levinrew

    Like

  16. Probably do Strong Poison by Dorothy L Sayers

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  17. Bev Hankins says:

    And a second 1930s book (or “boo” as I said previously): The Mystery of Burnleigh Manor by Walter Livingston

    Like

  18. Pingback: #138: The Second Shot (1930) by Anthony Berkeley | The Invisible Event

  19. It Walks By Night is up on my blog – Rhode’s Peril At Cranbury Hall would be too if I hadn’t left the book at work on Friday, and a third book should be along before October too…

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  20. Jason Half says:

    Thanks again for this wonderful monthly contest. Here is the link to my review of WHILE THE PATIENT SLEPT by Mignon Eberhart. Halfway through reading Milward Kennedy’s HALF-MAST MURDER, which will be my second…
    http://www.jasonhalf.com/blog/book-review-while-the-patient-slept-1930-by-mignon-g-eberhart

    Like

  21. Pingback: Review: Pietr the Latvian, 1930 (Inspector Maigret #1) by Georges Simenon (Trans: David Bellos) – A Crime is Afoot

  22. Pingback: Review: The Coldstone (1930) by Patricia Wentworth – A Crime is Afoot

  23. Pingback: Peril At Cranbury Hall by John Rhode – In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel

  24. Here’s my second review – Peril At Cranbury Hall by that Rhode bloke. And (for a change for me on Crimes Of The Century) it’s a bit of a cracker…

    Like

  25. Pingback: The Case of Sir Adam Braid (1930) by Molly Thynne | crossexaminingcrime

  26. John says:

    I’ve read three and here’s the first of the lot: The Affair of the Gallows Tree One of the most unusual detective novels I’ve read in a long time. More like a western/detective novel amalgam with some very inventive touches throughout the intriguing story.

    Like

  27. RogerBW says:

    My first for the month: Strong Poison.

    Like

  28. Jason Half says:

    My review for HALF-MAST MURDER by Milward Kennedy.
    I would welcome any additional perspectives from you well-read mystery fans about Kennedy’s books. This was my first encounter with this author, and perhaps I got hold of the wrong end of the elephant. Feel free to drop me a line if you want to share your thoughts. All best — Jason

    http://www.jasonhalf.com/blog/book-review-half-mast-murder-1930-by-milward-kennedy

    Like

  29. Pingback: Review: PIETR THE LATVIAN by Georges Simenon | Reactions to Reading

  30. John says:

    #2 is up now. Twice Dead by E.M. Channon. If I reviewed on Twitter it would be a brief one word summation: Meh.

    Like

  31. Brad says:

    JD Carr’s debut novel, It Walks by Night, is such a milestone that I convinced JJ to guest star and be interviewed about it! 🙂
    https://ahsweetmysteryblog.wordpress.com/2016/09/22/you-always-remember-your-first-car/

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Pingback: Review: The Maltese Falcon (1930) by Dashiell Hammett – A Crime is Afoot

  33. John says:

    My third is not a milestone by any means, but a very fine detective novel all the same. Third time’s the charm, I guess. Has a very well done climactic courtroom trial with all sorts of legal trickery reminiscent of the best of Post and Gardner. All about the murder of an IRA terrorist. Wild Justice by George A Birmingham. So rich and insightful, gave me a lot to mull over when I was done.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Pingback: The Four Armourers by Francis Beeding – In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel

  35. The deeply disappointing The Four Armourers by Francis Beeding makes it three reviews from me so far – with luck, there’ll be a fourth soon.

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  36. tracybham says:

    My post for a 1930 book is for The Diamond Feather by Helen Reilly, posted on September 21st at Bitter Tea and Mystery. My favorite Helen Reilly book so far.

    Like

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