#1936book sign-up page

1936policemanLook, this is a bit embarrassing. I don’t think I’ll be finishing the crime-fiction-of-the-year (1967) round-up on time this month. First one I’ve missed in almost a year.

However, don’t let that stand in the way of April. Lucy @richmondie has chosen a year for us – 1936 – so here is a sign-up page for all you bloggers. All you have to do is read a book, watch a film, read a comic, listen to a radio programme, from 1936, and tell us all about it.

Anyone can play, so over to you…

Small print

  • Don’t be shy!
  • Just comment below to link to your blog post.
  • If you want to play but you haven’t got a blog, I’m happy to have you as a guest poster, or to link to Goodreads or Amazon.
  • Books, comics, films, plays and TV also welcome.
  • Sorry in advance if I miss you in the round-up, although I am getting better at that bit.

 

About pastoffences

Past Offences exists to review classic crime and mystery books, with ‘classic’ meaning books originally published before 1987.
This entry was posted in Crime fiction of the year challenge, Crimes of the Century, Information Received and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

48 Responses to #1936book sign-up page

  1. realthog says:

    As usual I’ll try to cover a movie or two. Maria Marten, or The Murder in the Red Barn seems like a good place to start. Will have to think about a book . . .

    Like

  2. Bev Hankins says:

    I’m back for more. This time my definite is The Murder of Sir Edmund Godfrey by John Dickson Carr. I may do more–depending on how the TBR stack goes.

    Like

  3. KerrieS says:

    I’m in too. Now to decide on the book.

    Like

  4. Jose Ignacio says:

    I’m searching for a book to participate, count with me.

    Like

  5. As ever, I’m definitely in but haven’t chosen a book yet. And, you have done such a fantastic job with this meme over the past year, you shouldn’t worry about timeliness!

    Like

  6. Most annoying. I don’t own many classics but I have books from 1935 and 1937 lying unread on the TBR mountain. Toddling off to see what the library can offer…

    Like

  7. Keishon says:

    I’ll see what I have….

    Like

  8. John says:

    I had a Reggie Fortune book pulled from my shelves for last month but never got to it. And of course it’s the wrong year. I still want to read one of H.C. Bailey’s books and luckily I have nearly all of them. So I’m choosing the only one published in 1936: A CLUE FOR MR FORTUNE.

    Like

  9. realthog says:

    All going well, I’ll be reading Erle Stanley Gardner’s The Case of the Stuttering Bishop (1936). A few nights ago, by sheerest happenstance, I saw the 1937 movie based on this novel; it popped up on t’telly just as I walked into the living room, and for once I sat down and watched. So, when I came across the novel while browsing through an ESG bibliography just now, I thought This Must Be A Sign.

    Like

  10. Pingback: ‘It was like being at a children’s panto’ #1967book round-up | Past Offences Classic Crime Fiction

  11. lesblatt says:

    I’m in. I have John Bude’s THE SUSSEX DOWNS MURDER scheduled for my podcast/blog for the last week in April, because its official British Library Crime Classics pub date in the US is May 5.

    Like

  12. Pingback: Review: Double Indemnity by James M. Cain | The Game's Afoot

  13. richmonde says:

    Here’s my review of Thankyou, Mr Moto by JP Marquand: http://wordcount-richmonde.blogspot.co.uk/2015/04/thankyou-mr-moto.html

    Like

  14. realthog says:

    Some scrappy Goodreads notes on Erle Stanley Gardner’s The Case of the Stuttering Bishop (1936) are here

    Like

  15. Pingback: Review: WINGS ABOVE THE DIAMANTINA by Arthur Upfield | Fair Dinkum Crime

  16. Pingback: I’d Give My Life (1936) | Noirish

  17. patrickmurtha says:

    This is my first time participating in this monthly round-up, and I have approached it in a slightly offbeat way, writing about a novel that probably none of you can read, and I can’t either, but whose historic and literary interest is self-evidently above average: Mercè Rodoreda’s Catalan-language “Crim,” a full-blown parody of the country house mystery.

    http://bookthemdanno.blogspot.mx/2015/04/crime-fiction-of-year-1936-crim-merce.html

    My blog, Book ’em, Danno!, is a books-and-movies-and general-culture blog, a successor to an earlier, similar effort called Patrick Murtha’s Diary. I also have another blog called Querétaro encantador which focuses on my life in the wonderful Mexican city of Querétaro.

    Liked by 1 person

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  19. tracybham says:

    I have a review for A Shilling for Candles by Tey at Bitter Tea and Mystery.

    Like

  20. Jose Ignacio says:

    A small hidden gem in public domain, Sabotage (1936) directed by Alfred Hitchcock, my post will soon be ready.

    Like

  21. Pingback: Film Notes: Sabotage (1936) directed by Alfred Hitchcock | The Game's Afoot

  22. Pingback: Seven Sinners (1936) | Noirish

  23. Pingback: Cards On The Table by Agatha Christie | In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel

  24. Pingback: Missing Girls (1936) | Noirish

  25. realthog says:

    And finally from me (phew!): Missing Girls (1936).

    Like

  26. lesblatt says:

    Here’s my review of John Bude’s “The Sussex Downs Murder” at http://www.classicmysteries.net/2015/04/the-sussex-downs-murder.html

    Like

  27. Col says:

    Here we go – a Western. Am I in, or will I get evicted? Dane Coolidge – Texans Die Hard. http://col2910.blogspot.co.uk/2015/04/dane-coolidge-texans-die-hard-1936.html

    Like

  28. Pingback: Endless Night – Agatha Christie | crimeworm

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