#1936book sign-up page

1936policemanLook, this is a bit embarrassing. I don’t think I’ll be finishing the crime-fiction-of-the-year (1967) round-up on time this month. First one I’ve missed in almost a year.

However, don’t let that stand in the way of April. Lucy @richmondie has chosen a year for us – 1936 – so here is a sign-up page for all you bloggers. All you have to do is read a book, watch a film, read a comic, listen to a radio programme, from 1936, and tell us all about it.

Anyone can play, so over to you…

Small print

  • Don’t be shy!
  • Just comment below to link to your blog post.
  • If you want to play but you haven’t got a blog, I’m happy to have you as a guest poster, or to link to Goodreads or Amazon.
  • Books, comics, films, plays and TV also welcome.
  • Sorry in advance if I miss you in the round-up, although I am getting better at that bit.

 

About pastoffences

Past Offences exists to review classic crime and mystery books, with ‘classic’ meaning books originally published before 1987.
Gallery | This entry was posted in Crime fiction of the year challenge, Crimes of the Century, Information Received and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

48 Responses to #1936book sign-up page

  1. realthog says:

    As usual I’ll try to cover a movie or two. Maria Marten, or The Murder in the Red Barn seems like a good place to start. Will have to think about a book . . .

    Like

  2. Bev Hankins says:

    I’m back for more. This time my definite is The Murder of Sir Edmund Godfrey by John Dickson Carr. I may do more–depending on how the TBR stack goes.

    Like

  3. KerrieS says:

    I’m in too. Now to decide on the book.

    Like

  4. Jose Ignacio says:

    I’m searching for a book to participate, count with me.

    Like

  5. As ever, I’m definitely in but haven’t chosen a book yet. And, you have done such a fantastic job with this meme over the past year, you shouldn’t worry about timeliness!

    Like

  6. Most annoying. I don’t own many classics but I have books from 1935 and 1937 lying unread on the TBR mountain. Toddling off to see what the library can offer…

    Like

  7. Keishon says:

    I’ll see what I have….

    Like

  8. John says:

    I had a Reggie Fortune book pulled from my shelves for last month but never got to it. And of course it’s the wrong year. I still want to read one of H.C. Bailey’s books and luckily I have nearly all of them. So I’m choosing the only one published in 1936: A CLUE FOR MR FORTUNE.

    Like

  9. realthog says:

    All going well, I’ll be reading Erle Stanley Gardner’s The Case of the Stuttering Bishop (1936). A few nights ago, by sheerest happenstance, I saw the 1937 movie based on this novel; it popped up on t’telly just as I walked into the living room, and for once I sat down and watched. So, when I came across the novel while browsing through an ESG bibliography just now, I thought This Must Be A Sign.

    Like

  10. Pingback: ‘It was like being at a children’s panto’ #1967book round-up | Past Offences Classic Crime Fiction

  11. lesblatt says:

    I’m in. I have John Bude’s THE SUSSEX DOWNS MURDER scheduled for my podcast/blog for the last week in April, because its official British Library Crime Classics pub date in the US is May 5.

    Like

  12. Pingback: Review: Double Indemnity by James M. Cain | The Game's Afoot

  13. richmonde says:

    Here’s my review of Thankyou, Mr Moto by JP Marquand: http://wordcount-richmonde.blogspot.co.uk/2015/04/thankyou-mr-moto.html

    Like

  14. realthog says:

    Some scrappy Goodreads notes on Erle Stanley Gardner’s The Case of the Stuttering Bishop (1936) are here

    Like

  15. Pingback: Review: WINGS ABOVE THE DIAMANTINA by Arthur Upfield | Fair Dinkum Crime

  16. Pingback: I’d Give My Life (1936) | Noirish

  17. patrickmurtha says:

    This is my first time participating in this monthly round-up, and I have approached it in a slightly offbeat way, writing about a novel that probably none of you can read, and I can’t either, but whose historic and literary interest is self-evidently above average: Mercè Rodoreda’s Catalan-language “Crim,” a full-blown parody of the country house mystery.

    http://bookthemdanno.blogspot.mx/2015/04/crime-fiction-of-year-1936-crim-merce.html

    My blog, Book ’em, Danno!, is a books-and-movies-and general-culture blog, a successor to an earlier, similar effort called Patrick Murtha’s Diary. I also have another blog called Querétaro encantador which focuses on my life in the wonderful Mexican city of Querétaro.

    Liked by 1 person

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  19. tracybham says:

    I have a review for A Shilling for Candles by Tey at Bitter Tea and Mystery.

    Like

  20. Jose Ignacio says:

    A small hidden gem in public domain, Sabotage (1936) directed by Alfred Hitchcock, my post will soon be ready.

    Like

  21. Pingback: Film Notes: Sabotage (1936) directed by Alfred Hitchcock | The Game's Afoot

  22. Pingback: Seven Sinners (1936) | Noirish

  23. Pingback: Cards On The Table by Agatha Christie | In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel

  24. Pingback: Missing Girls (1936) | Noirish

  25. realthog says:

    And finally from me (phew!): Missing Girls (1936).

    Like

  26. lesblatt says:

    Here’s my review of John Bude’s “The Sussex Downs Murder” at http://www.classicmysteries.net/2015/04/the-sussex-downs-murder.html

    Like

  27. Col says:

    Here we go – a Western. Am I in, or will I get evicted? Dane Coolidge – Texans Die Hard. http://col2910.blogspot.co.uk/2015/04/dane-coolidge-texans-die-hard-1936.html

    Like

  28. Pingback: Endless Night – Agatha Christie | crimeworm

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